Discurso de Lula da Silva (excerto)

___diegophc

sábado, 18 de Julho de 2009

"Abraçando o Globo: Portugal e o Mundo nos Séculos XVI e XVII"

Ein Europäer, gesehen von einem indischen Künstler aus dem 17 Jahrhundert
Victoria and Albert Museum


This map, depicting one hemisphere of Kunyu quantu from the Harvard-Yenching Library collection.jpgSeptember 19, 2007 – Two maps from the Harvard-Yenching Library’s Chinese Rare Books Collection spent the summer on display at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. The maps, 1860 reprints of maps by Dutch Jesuit missionary, astronomer, and cartographer Ferdinand Verbiest (1623-1688), were part of an exhibition titled "Encompassing the Globe: Portugal and the World in the 16th and 17th Centuries," which ran June 24 through September 16.
.
The exhibit focused on how Portuguese voyages in those centuries—to far-flung destinations like the west coast of Africa, Brazil, India, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, China, and Japan—led to significant cultural interchange and resulted in paintings, manuscripts, maps, and other works of art that, according to the exhibition website, “show the formation of a modern view of the world.”
.
The Verbiest work loaned by Harvard-Yenching, “Kunyu quantu” (A Complete Geographical Map of the Earth), was published around 1674 and consisted of two maps showing two hemispheres. Xiao-He Ma, Librarian for the Chinese Collection at Harvard-Yenching, notes that although Verbiest’s biggest achievement actually lay in six huge bronze astronomical instruments he designed and built, he also contributed significantly to Chinese cartography.
.
“When European cartography was first introduced into China in the late 16th century, the major difference between European and Chinese cartography was that traditional Chinese mapmakers treated the earth as flat,” explains Ma. “Maps by Matteo Ricci and Ferdinand Verbiest were the two greatest representatives of European cartography. Through Ricci and Verbiest's maps, Chinese mapmakers were introduced to the Ptolemaic system of organizing cartographic space.”

coroa - açores

When Ferdinand Magellan set out on the expedition that would circumnavigate the globe (1519-1521)

Three shipwrecked Portuguese sailors were the first Europeans to reach Japan, in 1543


This world map by German cartographer Henricus Martellus (who lived in Florence Italy) shows the world as Europe knew it in 1489


This illustration, from an early Indian history of Portuguese activities (ca 1603-1604)


Their chief export, however, was Christianity. - 1600


The colony's growing wealth was evident in its many churches and the art to adorn them (a 17th-century silver altar vessel).


the 1502 Cantino Planisphere (pormenor)


Portuguese King Manuel I (who ruled from 1495-1521 tapeçaria


Portugal's voyages of discovery turned the nation into a trading empire.
Maps, such as the 1502 Cantino Planisphere, traced a new view of the world


Chegada dos portugueses ao Japão


plate_portuguese_seal


sem legenda


Painted tiles panel_Paço de Arcos


oratório portátil, completamente aberto e com a representação da ascendência da Virgem,
das colecções do Museu de Évora.

matéria: madeira de teca e marfim policromado e dourado
cronologia: 2ª metade do século XVII








Miracle of St Francis Xavier, Andre Reinoso (active 1610-1641), Portugal 1619-1622
Oil on canvas 104 x 164 cm
Santa Casa de Misericordia de Lisboa Museu de Sao Roque, Lisbon, Portugal

Led by explorer Jorge Alvares, the Portuguese arrived on the southern coast of China in 1513


Known to the Japanese as Southern Barbarians because they arrived, in 1543, from the south


Jan Mostaert, ca 1472-1555-56
Portrait of a Black Man
Oil on panel Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam


jahangir


In 1500, a Portuguese fleet commanded by Pedro Alvares Cabral landed by accident [?!] on the coast of Brazil


Explorer Vasco da Gama sailed his four ships into the Indian Ocean in late 1497 Before long Portuguese merchants were trading in luxury goods (mother-of-pearl ewer made in Gujarat



sem legenda


Cultural cross-pollination inspired works of art, like this c. 1600 ivory carving from China, likely inspired by the Virgin and Child


Reconstituição da caravela Boa Esperança


Caixa de pérolas de cultura


Beginning in the 1430s, navigators sailing under the Portuguese flag explored from Africa's west coast all the way to the Cape of Good Hope, which they rounded in 1488


Because of Portugal's explorations, Europeans were also made aware of exotic animals
The Rhinoceros by Albrecht Dürer, 1515


As obras “Chafariz d'el Rey” anónimo c 1570-80
Colecção Joe Berardo


An ivory knife case from the Kongo


Albert Eckhout, Still Life with pineapple, melon, and other tropical fruits,
Oil on canvas
Image The National Museum of Denmark, Ethnographic Collection, Copenhagen

A zebra taken from Africa to India in 1621 was depicted by an artist in the court of Mogul emperor Jahangir


A 17th-century work from Japan's Edo period


This world map by German cartographer Henricus Martellus (who lived in Florence, Italy) shows the world as Europe knew it in 1489. Though it reflected many new discoveries, it was largely based on ancient sources, including the maps of Ptolemy, which dated to the second century A.D. In a few years, voyages by Christopher Columbus and other explorers, especially the Portuguese, would change the map considerably. "It's quite amazing...to see these very vague contours rather quickly turning into the contours that you know from modern maps," says Jay Levenson, curator of "Encompassing the Globe."

.
This illustration, from an early Indian history of Portuguese activities (ca. 1603-1604), shows the drowning of Bahadur Shah, a Hindu sultan, during an on-ship meeting with the Portuguese governor. The Portuguese said that the sultan jumped overboard; Indians insisted that he was pushed. The Portuguese could be "ruthless," says Jay Levenson. "They certainly had no hesitation in battling, capturing people, executing people, setting ships afire."
.
The British Library Board

.

Three shipwrecked Portuguese sailors were the first Europeans to reach Japan, in 1543. They brought firearms, a technology that the island nation soon adopted. This Japanese gunpowder flask, from the late 16th century, depicts Portuguese men wearing bombachas, or baggy pantaloons, a style of dress that amused the Japanese.
.
Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga, Lisbon, Portugal; Photo: Luis Pavão

.

When Ferdinand Magellan set out on the expedition that would circumnavigate the globe (1519-1521), he was looking for a route to the Spice Islands, or the Moluccas, now part of Indonesia. Magellan was killed en route, but his navigator Antonio Pigafetta survived. This map, which includes a clove tree, is a from a 1525 French copy of Pigafetta's journal.
Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, New Haven











Portuguese King Manuel I (who ruled from 1495-1521), commissioned this Belgian tapestry to commemorate explorer Vasco da Gama's "discovery" of India in 1498. Da Gama is the figure at the left, kneeling before an Indian sultan. In the center, Portuguese sailors load exotic animals—including, strangely, a unicorn—into their ships, for transport to the Portuguese royal zoo.
Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga, Lisbon, Portugal
___________________
















































.
.

.
The country's global adventurism in the 16th century linked continents and cultures as never before, as a new exhibition makes clear
.
.



*** Explorer Vasco da Gama sailed his four ships into the Indian Ocean in late 1497. Before long, Portuguese merchants were trading in luxury goods (mother-of-pearl ewer made in Gujarat, India, in the early 16th century and mounted in Naples, c. 1640) and exotic animals.
.
Private Collection

.
.
Known to the Japanese as "Southern Barbarians" because they arrived, in 1543, from the south, the Portuguese (with pantaloons, hats and caricatured noses in a detail from a 17th-century Japanese folding screen) traded in precious goods.
.
Freer Gallery of Art, SI

.
.

Their chief export, however, was Christianity. By 1600, the number of converts reached some 300,000. But the religion would be banned, and suspected converts were made to walk on fumi-e, plaques to step on of religious images.
.
Tokyo National Museum
.
.
Led by explorer Jorge Alvares, the Portuguese arrived on the southern coast of China in 1513. Since China had forbidden official commerce between its own citizens and Japan, the Portuguese served as middlemen, trading in pepper from Malacca, silks from China and silver from Japan. Chinese porcelain (a 16th-century bottle, mounted in England c. 1585) was in demand because the technique was unknown outside Asia.
.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
.
.

Beginning in the 1430s, navigators sailing under the Portuguese flag explored from Africa's west coast all the way to the Cape of Good Hope, which they rounded in 1488. Most African works of art from this period were created for export (a 16th-century ivory saltcellar from the Benin Kingdom of today's Nigeria).
.
British Museum, London

.
.

In 1500, a Portuguese fleet commanded by Pedro Alvares Cabral landed by accident on the coast of Brazil. After initially setting up a trading center there, as they had done in Africa and Asia, the Portuguese established a colony. Its economy was based on brazilwood—the source of a valuable red dye—that was harvested with the help of local Indians (a c. 1641 painting of a Brazilian Tapuya woman by Dutch artist Albert Eckhout) and, later, sugar, which depended on the labor of slaves brought from Africa.
.
National Museum of Denmark, Ethnographic Collection, Copenhagen
.
.

"Abraçando o Globo: Portugal e o Mundo nos Séculos XVI e XVII,"
.

WASHINGTON - O Presidente Cavaco Silva acabou de descobrir a sua herança na capital dos Estados Unidos. Durante uma visita privada, na quarta-feira, à exposição "Abraçando o Globo: Portugal e o Mundo nos Séculos XVI e XVII," que irá abrir ao público no dia 24 de junho no Smithsonian Freer Gallery of Art e Arthur M. Slacker. A exposição apresentará cerca de 250 peças produzidas por cada uma das culturas contactadas pelas primeiras rotas comerciais de Portugal e está focada no impacto das descobertas portuguesas na Europa e na troca de conhecimentos com os povos que os Portugueses encontraram. "Portugal está na moda na capital, especialmente com a visita do presidente," disse James Gordon, director de relações públicas e marketing no Smithsonian. "A exposição é o tema do momento. O Instituo de Turismo Português têm feito uma campanha publicitária realmente grande e fala-se muito sobre a exposição." O custo da exposição está estimado em $5 milhões e o instituto espera atrair perto de 250,000 visitantes. A exibição estará patente até ao dia 16 de Setembro. Os artefactos expostos fizeram cair o queixo de Manuel Silva Pereira, Assesor da Cultura na Embaixada Portuguesa em Washington. "Confirmou todas as minhas expectativas. Tem peças absolutamente únicas. Gostava de ter pelo menos 20 delas em casa," gracejou Pereira. "Dos Açores vem uma coroa de prata do Espírito Santo do século 17 que é muito significativa e há peças inacreditáveis, fascinantes que vem de Portugal e de outros países." O Director da galeria Julian Raby disse que este é o projecto mais ambicioso na história da instituição. "Através da sua mensagem global e das importantes componentes dedicadas às artes da Ásia e do Próximo Oriente, 'Encompassing the Globe' é uma exposição ideal para a Smithsonian," disse Raby. "Estamos extremamente gratos ao Ministério da Cultura de Portugal pelo seu generoso apoio financeiro e pela sua parceria organizativa, sem o qual esta exposição não seria possível." A exposição incluirá peças exóticas Kunstkammer coleccionadas pelos Habsburgo e pelos Medici, entre outros, reunidas a partir de colecção europeias, mapas raros do séc. XVI de cartógrafos portugueses e florentinos. Em exposição estão também tubas de caça e saleiros esculpidos em marfim na África Ocidental e Central, estátuas de terracota e outras obras religiosas do Brasil do séc. XVII, peças de madrepérola da Índia em montagens europeias de pratarias e instrumentos científicos produzidos para corte imperial chinesa pelos primeiros missionários Jesuítas.
.
©O Jornal 2007 o jornal.com/

.
.

“Encompassing the Globe: Portugal and the World in the 16th and 17th centuries”
.

Foi pedida colaboração para a exposição internacional de arte portuguesa dos séculos XVI e XVII, “Encompassing the Globe: Portugal and the World in the 16th and 17th centuries”, patente ao público na Freer Gallery of Art/ Arthur Sackler Gallery, da Smithsonian Institution, em Washington, de 23 de Junho a 16 de Setembro. A participação do Museu é feita através da cedência de 7 obras de arte: duas pinturas seiscentistas de André Reinoso, alusivas à vida de S. Francisco Xavier, duas esculturas seiscentistas representando Santo Inácio de Loyola e S. Francisco Xavier, um cofre namban quinhentista, em madeira e madrepérola, um cofre relicário, em tartaruga e prata do século XVI e uma custódia-relicário, sino-portuguesa, em prata, do século XVII. Três destas peças seguirão para Bruxelas, onde estarão presentes no Palais des Beaux– Arts, de 27 de Outubro de 2007 a 3 de Fevereiro de 2008, em exposição realizada no contexto da presidência portuguesa da União Europeia.
.
in Boletim da SCMLxa
.
.

Em exposição estão 264 peças relacionadas com a gesta dos portugueses no Mundo
.
Em exposição estão 264 peças relacionadas com a gesta dos portugueses no Mundo, nos séculos XVI e XVII, pertencentes a várias colecções particulares e institucionais dediversos países, e entre elas uma coroa do Espírito Santo seiscentista, oriunda donúcleo de Arte Sacra do Museu Carlos Machado, em Ponta Delgada, que despertou muito interesse por parte da imprensa e convidados, na pré-abertura que decorreu ontem de manhã na capital norte-americana.Na apresentação da exposição à imprensa, o director das galerias da prestigiadaSmithsonian Institution onde decorre a mostra, sublinhando o impacto cultural doacontecimento, disse que este é o mais ambicioso projecto daqueles espaços deexposições e o segundo maior de sempre, em dimensão.O papel dos marinheiros portugueses naqueles dois séculos foi mesmo comparado a uma "primeira globalização", com efeitos imensos no comércio e "no florescer deexpressões artísticas" nos cinco Continentes, realçou.Entre outros agradecimentos a variadas entidades que patrocinaram o evento, JulianRaby destacou o Governo Regional dos Açores, entre os apoios institucionais.O curador da exposição, Jay Levenson, apresentou, por seu turno, a estrutura doevento, dividido em seis secções temáticas, a primeira das quais relacionada comPortugal e a Europa, composta por rudimentares mapas e sucessivas actualizações,utilizados pelos navegadores portugueses, passando por ourivesaria, e outras formasde arte.É neste segmento que se encontra exposta a coroa do Espírito Santo, símbolo dauniversalidade, que fazia parte do espólio da Igreja do Recolhimento de SantaBárbara, em Ponta Delgada, e que hoje está à Guarda do Museu Carlos Machado.Seguem-se as temáticas Oceano Índico, China, Japão e Brasil, ocupando todos osespaços da Galeria Arthur M. Sackler, enquanto que a secção que incide sobre a artede África Ocidental está no Museu Nacional de Arte Africana, contíguo à galeria ondeestão todas as outras peças, espaços que, a par de outros 14, em Washington, fazemparte da Smithsonian Institution.Presentes, também, na conferência de imprensa desta manhã, a ministra da Cultura dePortugal, Isabel Pires de Lima, e o ministro da Economia, Manuel Pinho, que falaram, igualmente, da gesta portuguesa a partir do século XV e da sua importância nacultura e no comércio mundiais.O Governo Regional dos Açores vai promover, em Setembro, uma visita à exposição de jornalistas da Região e das comunidades.

.
.



Oratório do séc. XVII foi restaurado para a exposição de Washington
.
Um oratório portátil do século XVII, dos mais completos do género em Portugal, sofreu um restauro profundo para integrar uma exposição da Smithsonian Institution, em Washington (EUA).A peça, com a representação da ascendência da Virgem, irá até à capital americana para figurar na exposição Encompassing the Globe: Portugal and the World in the 16th and 17th Centuries, que decorre de 23 de Junho a 16 de Setembro.O evento, que tem o apoio do Ministério da Cultura português, reúne cerca de 300 objectos produzidos, nos séculos XVI e XVII, pelos diversos povos "tocados" pelas rotas comerciais portuguesas. Apresentado regularmente em exposições nacionais e estrangeiras, o oratório portátil indo-português, de madeira de teca e marfim policromado e dourado, estava um pouco degradado e, em troca da cedência à Smithsonian Institution, o Museu de Évora assegurou o restauro. "Foi, em parte, uma contrapartida. Pensávamos que o restauro ia ser pouco profundo, mas a peça sofreu bastante", observou, em declarações à agência Lusa, Joaquim Caetano, director do Museu de Évora, frisando que o "cuidadoso" restauro efectuado pelo atelier da conservadora- restauradora Conceição Ribeiro permitiu "fazer reviver alguns valores do oratório que se pensava estarem perdidos". Os repintes foram retirados e a verdadeira policromia e os dourados da peça voltaram a "ver a luz do dia", num trabalho que durou cerca de três meses. O objecto, que servia para uma devoção mais individualizada, regressou em Março ao núcleo provisório do Museu de Évora. A referência surge pela primeira vez num inventário de 1940."Este tipo de oratórios terão sido comuns em Portugal. Hoje só existem três ou quatro conhecidos. O mais próximo deste, mas não tão completo, está no Museu de Arte Antiga", disse. Com as armas dos dominicanos no topo, o oratório tem três painéis articulados de cada lado com a representação da genealogia da Virgem, tema muito comum em Portugal na talha do século XVII.Dada a importância do oratório, uma das mais importantes das 20 mil peças do acervo do Museu de Évora, o empréstimo à Smithsonian Institution reveste-se de diversas cautelas.O objecto será transportado para Washington numa caixa dupla que, além de "absorver os choques", permite "manter a temperatura e humidade ideais", sendo depois exposto em condições que preservem os seus pigmentos orgânicos, a madeira e o marfim. DN Segunda, 9 de Abril de 2007 Edição Papel



.




This map, depicting one hemisphere of "Kunyu quantu" from the Harvard-Yenching Library collection, was on loan to the Smithsonian for a recent exhibition, "Encompassing the Globe: Portugal and the World in the 16th and 17th Centuries."

.
.

------------- Domingo, 28 Outubro 2007 - 00:18
.
Pires de Lima quer exposição A ministra portuguesa da Cultura, Isabel Pires de Lima, referiu ontem em Bruxelas que espera ter a exposição ‘Encompassing the Globe’ (‘Volta do Globo’), sobre os Descobrimentos, no início de 2008 no nosso país. cm
.

Sem comentários: